Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Durable Radiaor

Durable Radiator
Your car radiator is the primary cooling mechanism for your engine. A small leak on your Radiator can be signaling a greater trouble. A cooling system that runs low too often is less efficient and you can damage your cooling system by letting the coolant level get too low. Too little coolant flow can be bad, but at normal and high operating temperatures, the rate at which coolant runs through the radiator doesn't change the amount of heat that is dissipated by the cooling cores. The amount of cooling won't be reduced even when the mean temperature of the coolant rises and flows faster.

Many cheap coolants do not have the corrosion protection, PH balancing, or sediment prevention that the high-grade coolants do. These low quality coolants do not have the same additives of name brand coolants. To help your engine stay cooler, rev up your engine slightly when you're overheating in traffic jam to help push more air across the cooling cores and more coolant through the engine.

All water-cooled radiators have an automatically controlled blower on the radiator. The way the system is supposed to work is that, after the engine is started, the thermostat on the engine stays closed until the coolant temperature at the ENGINE reaches 87C (189F) degrees. It is the responsibility of the Radiator to keep the coolant temperature from running too high. However, if the temperature is too high it is not necessarily the radiator.

A poor radiator cap won't last as long or stay properly calibrated, and either open at too low or two high a pressure. Make sure your radiator cap is the proper one for your cooling system. Higher pressure implies a higher boiling point, which means more efficient cooling. A new radiator cap is usually all that is required for this (but don’t over pressurize your radiator cores and wreck the whole system).

Most Radiators' cooling system failures develop from poor radiator maintenance. Many radiator problems can be prevented with regular maintenance and periodic professional inspections of you car radiator and cooling system. The most common radiator problems are: leaky fittings or seams, fin deterioration and bond failure, electrolysis, cracked tank, and fan damage.